UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids: Comparison of community pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and patients with asthma

Driesenaar, JA; De Smet, PAGM; van Hulten, R; Horne, R; Zwikker, H; van den Bemt, B; van Dulmen, S; (2016) Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids: Comparison of community pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and patients with asthma. Journal of Asthma , 53 (10) pp. 1051-1058. 10.1080/02770903.2016.1180696. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Horne_Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids.pdf

Download (504kB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare pharmacists' and pharmacy technicians' perceptions of patients' beliefs regarding inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with those of patients and to compare the ICS beliefs of pharmacists and technicians with those of patients with asthma. METHODS: 1269 community pharmacies were approached to fill out an online questionnaire; 1952 patients were sent a questionnaire by post. Beliefs (i.e., necessity and concerns) regarding ICS were measured using (an adapted version of) the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ-specific). Pharmacists and technicians were instructed to fill out the BMQ for themselves, and to fill it out in the way they thought most of their patients would complete it. RESULTS: 136 pharmacists, 90 pharmacy technicians and 161 patients with asthma completed the questionnaire. Pharmacists and technicians thought patients had more concerns about ICS than patients themselves reported (p < 0.0001). They also thought that patients had stronger beliefs in their personal need for ICS than patients reported (p < 0.01). Pharmacists reported lower levels of concerns than patients (p < 0.05) and both providers attributed a higher level of necessity to ICS than patients did (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Pharmacists and technicians overestimate the personal need for treatment as well as the concerns patients with asthma have regarding ICS. They also have, to some extent, stronger positive beliefs about ICS than patients. If pharmacists and technicians expect that patients share their positive views about ICS, they might be less likely to elicit and address patients' doubts and concerns about ICS, which might be relevant for effective ICS treatment and subsequent patient outcomes.

Type: Article
Title: Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids: Comparison of community pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and patients with asthma
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/02770903.2016.1180696
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2016.1180696
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the Journal of asthma on 17 May 2016 available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02770903.2016.1180696
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Allergy, Respiratory System, Beliefs about medicines, perceptions of patients' beliefs, patient-pharmacist communication, adherence, patient-centered communication, OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE, REFILL ADHERENCE, MEDICATION, MEDICINES, OUTCOMES, MANAGEMENT, NONADHERENCE, SPECIALISTS, THERAPIES, EDUCATION
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Practice and Policy
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1493367
Downloads since deposit
118Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item