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Frequency tuning of the efferent effect on cochlear gain in humans

Drga, V; Plack, CJ; Yasin, I; (2016) Frequency tuning of the efferent effect on cochlear gain in humans. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology , 894 pp. 477-484. 10.1007/978-3-319-25474-6_50. Green open access

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Abstract

Cochlear gain reduction via efferent feedback from the medial olivocochlear bundle is frequency specific (Guinan, Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 18:447-453, 2010). The present study with humans used the Fixed Duration Masking Curve psychoacoustical method (Yasin et al., J Acoust Soc Am 133:4145-4155, 2013a; Yasin et al., Basic aspects of hearing: physiology and perception, pp 39-46, 2013b; Yasin et al., J Neurosci 34:15319-15326, 2014) to estimate the frequency specificity of the efferent effect at the cochlear level. The combined duration of the masker-plus-signal stimulus was 25 ms, within the efferent onset delay of about 31-43 ms (James et al., Clin Otolaryngol 27:106-112, 2002). Masker level (4.0 or 1.8 kHz) at threshold was obtained for a 4-kHz signal in the absence or presence of an ipsilateral 60 dB SPL, 160-ms precursor (200-Hz bandwidth) centred at frequencies between 2.5 and 5.5 kHz. Efferent-mediated cochlear gain reduction was greatest for precursors with frequencies the same as, or close to that of, the signal (gain was reduced by about 20 dB), and least for precursors with frequencies well removed from that of the signal (gain remained at around 40 dB). The tuning of the efferent effect filter (tuning extending 0.5-0.7 octaves above and below the signal frequency) is within the range obtained in humans using otoacoustic emissions (Lilaonitkul and Guinan, J Assoc Res Otolaryngol 10:459-470, 2009; Zhao and Dhar, J Neurophysiol 108:25-30, 2012). The 10 dB bandwidth of the efferent-effect filter at 4000 Hz was about 1300 Hz (Q10 of 3.1). The FDMC method can be used to provide an unbiased measure of the bandwidth of the efferent effect filter using ipsilateral efferent stimulation.

Type: Article
Title: Frequency tuning of the efferent effect on cochlear gain in humans
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-25474-6_50
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-25474-6_50
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2016. This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.5 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/) which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited. The images or other third party material in this chapter are included in the work’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if such material is not included in the work’s Creative Commons license and the respective action is not permitted by statutory regulation, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to duplicate, adapt or reproduce the material.
Keywords: Auditory, Compression, Efferent, Fixed-duration masking curves, Forward masking, Frequency-range, Gain, Precursor
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1489296
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