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Reading Recovery and Every Child a Reader : history, policy, and practice

Burroughs-Lange, S; Ince, A; Burroughs-Lange, S; Ince, A; (2013) Reading Recovery and Every Child a Reader : history, policy, and practice. [Book]. IOE Press: London.

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Abstract

Reading Recovery and Every Child a Reader describes the origins and implementation of an approach to early literacy designed to ensure that every child leaves primary school able to read. This approach, called Every Child a Reader, was developed from the established early literacy intervention, Reading Recovery. This book describes the main features of Reading Recovery – how it operates for each child, how the teachers are trained to teach them, and the infrastructure necessary for Reading Recovery to make an effective impact on the poorest literacy learners in primary school. The story of Every Child a Reader is a model of how effective interventions need to be supported to ensure that their effectiveness is not jeopardised as they expand in scale and scope. This book captures a particular period in educational and political history, surveying the policy and practice that shaped the implementation of a successful national early literacy intervention that has had a significant impact on school standards. This book is essential reading for all those interested or involved in early literacy and the prevention of literacy failure through effective intervention; to those who have heard about Reading Recovery but are not familiar with its operation in the UK, and to those involved in managing large-scale interventions in schools.Table of Contents: CONTENTS: Foreword (Jean Gross); Introduction (Amanda Ince); 1. Reading Recovery, an early literacy intervention (Julia Douëtil, Angela Hobsbaum, and Phyl Maidment); 2. How Every Child a Reader grew from Reading Recovery (Sue Burroughs-Lange, Julia Douëtil, and Angela Hobsbaum); 3. The theoretical and pedagogical base of Reading Recovery (Sue Bodman and John Smith); 4. Experts gaining expertise (Susan Taylor, Janet Ferris, and Glen Franklin); 5. Creatively responding to the imperative of scaling up Every Child a Reader (Penny Amott, Val Hindmarsh, and Helen Morris); 6. From innovation to normalization (Sue Burroughs-Lange);Index.

Type: Book
Title: Reading Recovery and Every Child a Reader : history, policy, and practice
Additional information: Reading Recovery and Every Child a Reader describes the origins and implementation of an approach to early literacy designed to ensure that every child leaves primary school able to read. This approach, called Every Child a Reader, was developed from the established early literacy intervention, Reading Recovery. This book describes the main features of Reading Recovery – how it operates for each child, how the teachers are trained to teach them, and the infrastructure necessary for Reading Recovery to make an effective impact on the poorest literacy learners in primary school. The story of Every Child a Reader is a model of how effective interventions need to be supported to ensure that their effectiveness is not jeopardised as they expand in scale and scope. This book captures a particular period in educational and political history, surveying the policy and practice that shaped the implementation of a successful national early literacy intervention that has had a significant impact on school standards. This book is essential reading for all those interested or involved in early literacy and the prevention of literacy failure through effective intervention; to those who have heard about Reading Recovery but are not familiar with its operation in the UK, and to those involved in managing large-scale interventions in schools.Table of Contents:CONTENTS: Foreword (Jean Gross); Introduction (Amanda Ince); 1. Reading Recovery, an early literacy intervention (Julia Douëtil, Angela Hobsbaum, and Phyl Maidment); 2. How Every Child a Reader grew from Reading Recovery (Sue Burroughs-Lange, Julia Douëtil, and Angela Hobsbaum); 3. The theoretical and pedagogical base of Reading Recovery (Sue Bodman and John Smith); 4. Experts gaining expertise (Susan Taylor, Janet Ferris, and Glen Franklin); 5. Creatively responding to the imperative of scaling up Every Child a Reader (Penny Amott, Val Hindmarsh, and Helen Morris); 6. From innovation to normalization (Sue Burroughs-Lange);Index.
UCL classification: UCL > School of Education
UCL > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Learning & Leadership
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1488713
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