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How Do Clinical Information Systems Affect the Cognitive Demands of General Practitioners?: Usability Study with a Focus on Cognitive Workload

Ariza, F; Kalra, D; Potts, HW; (2015) How Do Clinical Information Systems Affect the Cognitive Demands of General Practitioners?: Usability Study with a Focus on Cognitive Workload. Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics , 22 (4) pp. 379-390. 10.14236/jhi.v22i4.85. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Clinical information systems in the National Health Service do not need to conform to any explicit usability requirements. Poor usability can increase the mental workload experienced by clinicians and cause fatigue, increase error rates and impact the overall patient safety. Mental workload can be used as a measure of usability. OBJECTIVE: To assess the subjective cognitive workload experienced by general practitioners (GPs) with their systems. To raise awareness of the importance of usability in system design among users, designers, developers and policymakers. METHOD: We used a modified version of the NASA Task Load Index, adapted for web. We developed a set of common clinical scenarios and computer tasks on an online survey. We emailed the study link to 199 clinical commissioning groups and 1,646 GP practices in England.  RESULTS: Sixty-seven responders completed the survey. The respondents had spent an average of 17 years in general practice, had experience of using a mean of 1.5 GP computer systems and had used their current system for a mean time of 6.7 years. The mental workload score was not different among systems. There were significant differences among the task scores, but these differences were not specific to particular systems. The overall score and task scores were related to the length of experience with their present system.  CONCLUSION: Four tasks imposed a higher mental workload on GPs: 'repeat prescribing', 'find episode', 'drug management' and 'overview records'. Further usability studies on GP systems should focus on these tasks. Users, policymakers, designers and developers should remain aware of the importance of usability in system design.What does this study add?• Current GP systems in England do not need to conform to explicit usability requirements. Poor usability can increase the mental workload of clinicians and lead to errors.• Some clinical computer tasks incur more cognitive workload than others and should be considered carefully during the design of a system.• GPs did not report overall very high levels of subjective cognitive workload when undertaking common clinical tasks with their systems.• Further usability studies on GP systems should focus on the tasks incurring higher cognitive workload.• Users, policymakers, and designers and developers should remain aware of the importance of usability in system design.

Type: Article
Title: How Do Clinical Information Systems Affect the Cognitive Demands of General Practitioners?: Usability Study with a Focus on Cognitive Workload
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.14236/jhi.v22i4.85
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.14236/jhi.v22i4.85
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2015 The Author(s). Published by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT under Creative Commons license http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: cognitive science, computerized medical record systems, general practice, human engineering, medical informatics, primary health care, user–computer interface
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics > CHIME
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1483232
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