UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (CAMS) study: safety and efficacy data for 12 months follow up.

Zajicek, JP; Sanders, HP; Wright, DE; Vickery, PJ; Ingram, WM; Reilly, SM; Nunn, AJ; (2005) Cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (CAMS) study: safety and efficacy data for 12 months follow up. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry , 76 (12) pp. 1664-1669. 10.1136/jnnp.2005.070136.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness and long term safety of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (MS), in a follow up to the main Cannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis (CAMS) study. METHODS: In total, 630 patients with stable MS with muscle spasticity from 33 UK centres were randomised to receive oral Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), cannabis extract, or placebo in the main 15 week CAMS study. The primary outcome was change in the Ashworth spasticity scale. Secondary outcomes were the Rivermead Mobility Index, timed 10 metre walk, UK Neurological Disability Score, postal Barthel Index, General Health Questionnaire-30, and a series of nine category rating scales. Following the main study, patients were invited to continue medication, double blinded, for up to 12 months in the follow up study reported here. RESULTS: Intention to treat analysis of data from the 80% of patients followed up for 12 months showed evidence of a small treatment effect on muscle spasticity as measured by change in Ashworth score from baseline to 12 months (Delta(9)-THC mean reduction 1.82 (n = 154, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53 to 3.12), cannabis extract 0.10 (n = 172, 95% CI -0.99 to 1.19), placebo -0.23 (n = 176, 95% CI -1.41 to 0.94); p = 0.04 unadjusted for ambulatory status and centre, p = 0.01 adjusted). There was suggestive evidence for treatment effects of Delta(9)-THC on some aspects of disability. There were no major safety concerns. Overall, patients felt that these drugs were helpful in treating their disease. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide limited evidence for a longer term treatment effect of cannabinoids. A long term placebo controlled study is now needed to establish whether cannabinoids may have a role beyond symptom amelioration in MS.

Type: Article
Title: Cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (CAMS) study: safety and efficacy data for 12 months follow up.
Location: England
DOI: 10.1136/jnnp.2005.070136
Keywords: Administration, Oral, Adolescent, Adult, Analgesics, Non-Narcotic, Cannabis, Disabled Persons, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Sclerosis, Placebos, Plant Extracts, Severity of Illness Index, Treatment Outcome
UCL classification: UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/147553
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item