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Mutual eye-gaze enhances gender categorization for typically developing children, but not for children with autism

Pellicano, L; Macrae, N; (2010) Mutual eye-gaze enhances gender categorization for typically developing children, but not for children with autism. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review , 16 (6) pp. 1094-1099. 10.3758/PBR.16.6.1094. Green open access

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Abstract

Previous investigations of gaze processing in autism have demonstrated a pattern of intact and impaired performance. Although individuals with autism are capable of discriminating another’s gaze, they fail to interpret gaze direction, especially within the context of sociocommunicative (i.e., mentalistic) interactions. Extending this general line of inquiry, we explored whether typical children and children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were influenced by gaze direction in a task that demanded a core person-related judgment—namely, sex categorization. The results revealed that typically developing school-aged children were faster to classify faces by sex when targets displayed direct rather than averted gaze, or when the eyes were closed. This was not the case, however, for children with ASD, whose responses were unaffected by gaze direction. These findings suggest that difficulties in gaze processing in autism extend beyond sociocommunicative inferences to include basic person-perception judgments.

Type: Article
Title: Mutual eye-gaze enhances gender categorization for typically developing children, but not for children with autism
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3758/PBR.16.6.1094
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/PBR.16.6.1094
Language: English
Additional information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/PBR.16.6.1094
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1475268
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