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Archaeology in Global Cities: Exploring The Profession In London and New York City

Morel, H; (2016) Archaeology in Global Cities: Exploring The Profession In London and New York City. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

International and national agendas and policies play a vital role in shaping the conduct of archaeologists and their associated institutions. They impact on research, practice, structures, management and the on-going development of archaeology as a profession. Cities, as test beds for innovative political changes and new forms of governance, are good sources for understanding how various groups, organisations and professions – including archaeology – need to renegotiate their role, position and value within urban society. Over the past few decades, researchers concerned with ‘the urban’ have discussed the impact of neoliberal policies on both urban governance and cultures of planning. Cities are struggling to deal with shifting distribution of powers, decision-making bodies, and the competitive demands of the global economy. Global cities often experience such challenges more strongly being attractive and lucrative spaces. In these processes environmental and cultural concerns, such as archaeology, can become sidelined. This thesis argues that global policies have led to critical changes in how archaeology is practised. Changes range from institutional restructuring, to personal dynamics, funding, and professional opportunities. The research investigates how values, standards, communication, collaboration levels, perceptions and processes have shifted through the eyes of urban archaeologists. In analysing 115 in-depth interviews with practitioners, investigating their experiences over the span of their careers, I explore perceptions of the current trajectory of city planning in shaping urban archaeology, and what we can learn from this global city phenomenon. The paper considers institutional and individual roles, identities, values, dynamics and systems of operation. Through a comparative study between two major global cities – London and New York City – I address the similar aspects and themes that emerge in the urban context, and suggest how these may be used to develop stronger approaches along with improved strategies for the sustainability of urban archaeology.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Archaeology in Global Cities: Exploring The Profession In London and New York City
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology Gordon Square
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1474220
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