UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Public interest in genetic testing for susceptibility to heart disease and cancer: a population-based survey in the UK

Sanderson, SC; Wardle, J; Jarvis, MJ; Humphries, SE; (2004) Public interest in genetic testing for susceptibility to heart disease and cancer: a population-based survey in the UK. PREV MED , 39 (3) 458 - 464. 10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.04.051.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Background. Given the current concerns about the clinical validity of commercially marketed genetic tests for multifactorial diseases, there is a surprising dearth of information about what public demand might be for genetic tests for any complex diseases other than cancer. The aim of this study was to examine interest in genetic testing for the most common multifactorial disease, heart disease, and to compare it with interest in testing for cancer in a general population sample that had not received detailed information about genetic tests.Methods. Interest in genetic testing for heart disease susceptibility was surveyed and compared to interest in genetic testing for cancer susceptibility among a nationally representative sample of 1,960 British adults as part of the Office for National Statistics Omnibus survey.Results. Sixty-nine percent of respondents expressed interest in being tested for genetic susceptibility to heart disease. Men, people aged 45-60 years, those with less education, and those with a family history were most interested in genetic testing for heart disease. Sixty-four percent of respondents expressed interest in genetic testing for susceptibility to cancer, and gender, age, and education, but not family history, were associated with interest. Conclusions. Interest in genetic testing for susceptibility to both heart disease and cancer was high, with the most educated individuals being the least interested in testing. Although the shift toward the `expert patient' is actively encouraged and consistent with today's health policies, there is considerable and justifiable concern about some of the genetic tests for multifactorial diseases that are currently being marketed directly to the public. The high level of initial interest in the general public found in this study supports the need for a public education program around genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. (C) 2004 The Institute For Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Public interest in genetic testing for susceptibility to heart disease and cancer: a population-based survey in the UK
DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.04.051
Keywords: genetic testing, heart disease, cancer, HUNTINGTON DISEASE, RISK, ATTITUDES, INFORMATION, INTENTION, DECISIONS, KNOWLEDGE, MEN, AGE
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics > Clinical Epidemiology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1474
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item