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The relationship between brain activity and peak grip force is modulated by corticospinal system integrity after subcortical stroke

Ward, NS; Newton, JM; Swayne, OBC; Lee, L; Frackowiak, RSJ; Thompson, AJ; Greenwood, RJ; (2007) The relationship between brain activity and peak grip force is modulated by corticospinal system integrity after subcortical stroke. EUR J NEUROSCI , 25 (6) 1865 - 1873. 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05434.x.

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Abstract

In healthy human subjects, the relative contribution of cortical regions to motor performance varies with the task parameters. Additionally, after stroke, recruitment of cortical areas during a simple motor task varies with corticospinal system integrity. We investigated whether the pattern of motor system recruitment in a task involving increasingly forceful hand grips is influenced by the degree of corticospinal system damage. Nine chronic subcortical stroke patients and nine age-matched controls underwent functional magnetic brain imaging whilst performing repetitive isometric hand grips. Target grip forces were varied between 15% and 45% of individual maximum grip force. Corticospinal system functional integrity was assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Averaged across all forces, there was more task-related activation compared with rest in the secondary motor areas of patients with greater corticospinal system damage, confirming previous reports. However, here we were primarily interested in regional brain activation, which covaried with the amount of force generated, implying a prominent executive role in force production. We found that in control subjects and patients with lesser corticospinal system damage, signal change increased linearly with increasing force output in contralateral primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area and ipsilateral cerebellum. In contrast, in patients with greater corticospinal system damage, force-related signal changes were seen mainly in contralesional dorsolateral premotor cortex, bilateral ventrolateral premotor cortices and contralesional cerebellum, but not ipsilesional primary motor cortex. These findings suggest that the premotor cortices might play a new and functionally relevant role in controlling force production in patients with more severe corticospinal system disruption.

Type: Article
Title: The relationship between brain activity and peak grip force is modulated by corticospinal system integrity after subcortical stroke
DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05434.x
Keywords: fMRI, human, motor cortex, premotor, stroke, transcranial magnetic stimulation, VENTRAL PREMOTOR CORTEX, PRIMARY MOTOR CORTEX, UPPER-LIMB MOTONEURONS, VOLUNTARY MOVEMENT, REACHING MOVEMENTS, HEMIPARETIC STROKE, CORTICAL-NEURONS, LATERAL SURFACE, FRONTAL-LOBE, TIME-SERIES
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/147162
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