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Life-course body mass index trajectories and blood pressure in mid life in two British birth cohorts: stronger associations in the later-born generation

Li, L; Hardy, R; Kuh, D; Power, C; (2015) Life-course body mass index trajectories and blood pressure in mid life in two British birth cohorts: stronger associations in the later-born generation. International Journal of Epidemiology , 44 (3) pp. 1018-1026. 10.1093/ije/dyv106. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the impact of recent increases in obesity and more rapid gains in body mass index (BMI) on cardiovascular risk factors. We investigated life-course BMI trajectories associations with adult blood pressure (BP) across two generations. METHODS: We used the the 1946 and 1958 British birth cohorts. Joint multivariate response models were fitted to longitudinal BMI measures [7, 11, 16, 20, 26, 36, 43 and 50 y (years): 1946 cohort, n = 4787; 7, 11, 16, 23, 33 and 45 y: 1958 cohort, n = 16 820] and mid-adult BP. We adopted linear spline models with random coefficients to characterize childhood and adult BMI slopes. RESULTS: Mean systolic BP (SBP) decreased from the earlier- to later-born cohort by 2.8 mmHg in females, not males; mean diastolic BP (DBP) decreased by 3.2-3.3 mmHg (both sexes). Adult BMI was higher in the later- than the earlier-born cohort by 1.3-1.8 kg/m2, slopes of BMI trajectory were steeper from early adulthood and associations with adult BP were stronger. Associations between adult BMI and SBP were stronger in the later-born cohort. For males, childhood BMI slope was associated with SBP only in the later-born cohort; the association for adult BMI slope was stronger in the later-born cohort: correlation coefficient r = 0.28 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.25,0.33] versus 0.13 (0.06,0.20). For females, childhood slope was associated with SBP in both cohorts; adult slope was associated with SBP only in the 1958 cohort [r = 0.34 (0.31,0.37)]. Patterns of child-to-adult BMI associations were similar in relation to DBP. CONCLUSIONS: BP did not increase between two generations born 12 y apart despite higher BMI levels. A stronger association between BMI trajectory and BP in the later-born cohort suggests that BMI-related effects may have been offset by improvements in other factors linked to BP, such as diet and smoking.

Type: Article
Title: Life-course body mass index trajectories and blood pressure in mid life in two British birth cohorts: stronger associations in the later-born generation
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyv106
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyv106
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: BMI trajectories, Cohort study, blood pressure, joint modelling, life course, body mass index procedure blood pressure adult child, Non-communicable Disease Risk Factors
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Pop, Policy and Practice Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1469072
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