UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Personality, work career, and health

Kivimäki, M; Virtanen, M; Elovainio, M; Vahtera, J; (2006) Personality, work career, and health. pp. 328-342. 10.1017/CBO9780511499784.022.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

© Cambridge University Press 2006 and Cambridge University Press, 2009. Most adults spend a major part of their life working. Work is a principal prerequisite for continuous income opportunities, and work role is related to learning possibilities, recurrent options of belonging to some significant group, and building one’s self esteem. Thus, work can represent an important source of well-being. On the other hand, several aspects of work may constitute health risks; and those aspects may vary across workplaces, jobs, and occupations. Physical and chemical hazards identified in studies include, for example, exposure to dust, heat, lead, carbon monoxide, asbestos, and noise. Examples of major psychosocial risk factors include high demands and work overload, low levels of control and support, and lack of employment security and organizational injustice. There are several different ways in which personality may interact with the work-health relationships (Figure 16.1). First, there is variation in how work affects health between individuals: a similarly stressful work induces greater health problems in some employees than others. Personality is assumed to be one important factor contributing to such variation. Personality is a source of individual differences in appraisal processes, physiological responding, coping, and health behaviors. Thus, certain aspects of personality can render some persons more vulnerable, others more resilient, to the effects of work risk factors. Second, people are not randomly distributed to workplaces, and personality may be one of the numerous selective factors. Certain jobs suit particular personalities and such people might be selected for such jobs and may selectively seek them out.

Type: Article
Title: Personality, work career, and health
DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511499784.022
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1467447
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item