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The relevance of Anthropology for Comparative Law

Hunter-Henin, M; (2013) The relevance of Anthropology for Comparative Law. Presented at: Law and Antropology, Department of Law and Anthropology in Halle (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology).

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Abstract

In this presentation, I will argue that a shift is discernible in comparative legal studies. The focus of comparative legal studies is nowadays less about the object of comparison (whether it be legal families, legal cultures, legal traditions) and more about a process of reflection and analysis of the concept of law itself. Where a comparative lawyer used traditionally to be understood as someone interested in how foreign law has influenced or may influence solutions in the domestic context, the modern comparatist often professes “global and interdisciplinary interests” and engages in social/scientific/philosophical/economic readings of the law The shift has had implications for legal anthropology and comparative law teaching within law programmes. “Law and approaches” now have an impact on straight course syllabi. However the number of disciplines used remains restricted with economics having the predominant influence. As an attempt to anchor legal reasoning and legal solutions into a renewed neutrality and objectivity, modern trends I would claim have failed. But as an intellectual endeavour, they have opened fascinating avenues for research and teaching.

Type: Conference item (Presentation)
Title: The relevance of Anthropology for Comparative Law
Event: Law and Antropology
Location: Department of Law and Anthropology in Halle (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology)
Dates: 27 November 2013 - 28 November 2013
Keywords: anthropology, Legal pluralism, Comparative law, Legal teaching
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Laws
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1457908
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