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Alcohol consumption, drinking patterns, and cognitive function in older Eastern European adults

Horvat, P; Richards, M; Kubinova, R; Pajak, A; Malyutina, S; Shishkin, S; Pikhart, H; ... Bobak, M; + view all (2015) Alcohol consumption, drinking patterns, and cognitive function in older Eastern European adults. Neurology , 84 (3) pp. 287-295. 10.1212/WNL.0000000000001164. Green open access

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate associations of frequency, quantity, binge, and problem drinking with cognitive function in older Eastern European adults. Methods: 14,575 participants, aged 47-78 years at cognitive assessment in 2006-2008 from Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland) and six Czech towns participating in the HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe) prospective cohort study. Average response rates were 59% at baseline (2002-2005) and 63% in 2006-2008. Alcohol consumption was assessed at baseline and in 2006-2008. Cognitive tests included immediate and delayed word recall, semantic fluency (animal naming) and letter cancellation. Associations between alcohol indices and cognitive scores were analysed cross-sectionally (all measures from 2006-2008) and prospectively (alcohol and covariates from 2002-2005 and cognition from 2006-2008). Results: In cross-sectional analyses, non-drinkers had lower cognitive scores and female moderate drinkers better cognitive performance than light drinkers. Heavy, binge and problem drinking were not consistently associated with cognitive function. Few associations were replicated in prospective analyses. Participants who stopped drinking during follow-up had worse cognition than stable drinkers; in men regression coefficients (95% CI) ranged from -0.26 [-0.36,-0.16] for immediate recall to -0.14 [-0.24,-0.04] for fluency. Conclusion: Regular and episodic heavy drinking were not consistently associated with cognitive function. Worse cognition in participants who stopped drinking during follow-up suggests that inclusion of less healthy ex-drinkers may partly explain poorer cognition in non-drinkers.

Type: Article
Title: Alcohol consumption, drinking patterns, and cognitive function in older Eastern European adults
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000001164
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000001164
Language: English
Additional information: © 2014 American Academy of Neurology. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Cognitive aging, All epidemiology, Cohort studies, Risk factors in epidemiology
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1450001
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