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The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioural therapy for psychosis: The role of client, therapist and therapy factors

Evans-Jones, Catherine; (2004) The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioural therapy for psychosis: The role of client, therapist and therapy factors. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

The study investigated which client, therapist, and therapy characteristics were associated with the quality of the therapeutic relationship in Cognitive-Behavioural therapy (CBT) for psychosis. The development of a good therapeutic relationship is essential to the work of CBT for psychosis but is often more difficult to achieve due to the nature of psychotic symptoms. Despite this, there has been little research investigating what affects the development of the therapeutic relationship within CBT for psychosis. The study had a cross-sectional, correlational design with measures taken at around the sixth session of therapy. Clients and therapists completed questionnaires measuring client, therapist, and therapy factors, and their perceptions of the therapeutic relationship. On average, both clients and therapists rated the therapeutic relationship as good. Although there was a trend towards agreement on the quality of the therapeutic relationship, on average clients rated it higher than therapists. There were few significant effects of client or therapist factors on the therapeutic relationship, including some unexpected negative results, e.g. no effect for psychotic symptoms. There were some significant effects for therapy factors and clients reports of the therapeutic relationship, e.g. the presentation of a case formulation.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioural therapy for psychosis: The role of client, therapist and therapy factors
Identifier: PQ ETD:602553
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest. Third party copyright material has been removed from the ethesis. Images identifying individuals have been redacted or partially redacted to protect their identity.
UCL classification: UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Experimental Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1446628
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