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Living with foster siblings: the adjustment of adolescent sons and daughters in families who foster.

Richardson, J.; (2007) Living with foster siblings: the adjustment of adolescent sons and daughters in families who foster. Doctoral thesis , University of London. Green open access

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Abstract

This paper aims to review how fostering affects the adjustment of adolescent sons and daughters in families who foster. The research is presented within a developmental psychopathology framework, addressing individual, parent-child and sibling factors that affect adolescents' adjustment. These factors are initially discussed in the context of 'normative' families and stepfamilies, as a prelude for understanding the adjustment of adolescents in reconstituted foster families. Secondly, fifteen studies were reviewed on birth children in families who foster. The literature specifically on adolescents in families who foster is scarce and most of the studies reviewed sampled birth children of all ages. Findings suggest that fostering affects the adjustment of birth children both positively and negatively. Birth children are more caring and mature as a result of fostering, but the relationship with their parents seems to change, resulting in less quality time. Finally, suggestions are made for future research, and clinical implications arising from the literature are discussed.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Living with foster siblings: the adjustment of adolescent sons and daughters in families who foster.
Identifier: PQ ETD:592387
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest. Sensitive information has been removed from the ethesis
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1445074
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