UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Differential effect of muscle vibration on intracortical inhibitory circuits in humans

Rosenkranz, K; Rothwell, JC; (2003) Differential effect of muscle vibration on intracortical inhibitory circuits in humans. J PHYSIOL-LONDON , 551 (2) 649 - 660. 10.1113/jphysiol.2003.043752.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Low amplitude muscle vibration (0.5 ms; 80 Hz; duration 1.5 s) was applied in turn to each of three different intrinsic hand muscles (first dorsal interosseus, FDl; abductor pollicis brevis, APB; and abductor digiti minimi, ADM) in order to test its effect on the EMG responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Recordings were also taken from flexor and extensor carpi radialis (FCR and ECR, respectively). We evaluated the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by a single TMS pulse, short interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation (SICI and ICF) and long interval intracortical inhibition (LICI). TMS pulses were applied 1s after the start of vibration with subjects relaxed throughout. Vibration increased the amplitude of MEPs evoked in the vibrated muscle (162 +/- 6 % of MEP with no vibration; mean +/- S.E.M.), but suppressed MEPs in the two non-vibrated hand muscles (72 9 %). Compared with no vibration (test response reduced to 51 +/- 5 % of control), there was less SICI in the vibrated muscle (test response reduced to 92 +/- 28 % of control) and more in the non-vibrated hand muscles (test response reduced to 27 +/- 5 % of control). The opposite occurred for LICI: compared with the no vibration condition (test response reduced to 33 6 % control), there was more LICI in the vibrated muscle (test response reduced to 17 3 % control) than in the non-vibrated hand muscles (test response reduced to 80 +/- 11 % control) even when the intensity of the test stimulus was adjusted to compensate for the changes in baseline MEP. There was no effect on ICF. Cutaneous stimulation of the index finger (80 Hz, 1.5 s duration, twice sensory threshold) had no consistent differential effect on any of the parameters. We conclude that vibratory input from muscle can differentially modulate excitability in motor cortical circuits.

Type: Article
Title: Differential effect of muscle vibration on intracortical inhibitory circuits in humans
DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2003.043752
Keywords: HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX, MAGNETIC TRANSCRANIAL STIMULATION, HUMAN HAND, SILENT PERIOD, CORTICOCORTICAL INHIBITION, CUTANEOMOTOR INTEGRATION, VOLUNTARY CONTRACTION, BRAIN-STIMULATION, DIGIT STIMULATION, AREAS 3A
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/144235
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item