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Why is it difficult to predict language impairment and outcome in patients with aphasia after stroke?

Charidimou, A; Kasselimis, D; Varkanitsa, M; Selai, C; Potagas, C; Evdokimidis, I; (2014) Why is it difficult to predict language impairment and outcome in patients with aphasia after stroke? Journal of Clinical Neurology , 10 (2) pp. 75-83. 10.3988/jcn.2014.10.2.75. Green open access

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Abstract

One of the most devastating consequences of stroke is aphasia. Communication problems after stroke can severely impair the patient's quality of life and make even simple everyday tasks challenging. Despite intense research in the field of aphasiology, the type of language impairment has not yet been localized and correlated with brain damage, making it difficult to predict the language outcome for stroke patients with aphasia. Our primary objective is to present the available evidence that highlights the difficulties of predicting language impairment after stroke. The different levels of complexity involved in predicting the lesion site from language impairment and ultimately predicting the long-term outcome in stroke patients with aphasia were explored. Future directions and potential implications for research and clinical practice are highlighted.

Type: Article
Title: Why is it difficult to predict language impairment and outcome in patients with aphasia after stroke?
Location: Korea (South)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3988/jcn.2014.10.2.75
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3988/jcn.2014.10.2.75
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2014 Korean Neurological Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: aphasia, language impairment, stroke
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1427739
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