UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Motivational modulation of bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease off and on dopaminergic medication.

Kojovic, M; Mir, P; Trender-Gerhard, I; Schneider, SA; Pareés, I; Edwards, MJ; Bhatia, KP; (2014) Motivational modulation of bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease off and on dopaminergic medication. J Neurol , 261 (6) pp. 1080-1089. 10.1007/s00415-014-7315-x. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
art%3A10.1007%2Fs00415-014-7315-x.pdf

Download (479kB)

Abstract

Motivational influence on bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease may be observed in situations of emotional and physical stress, a phenomenon known as paradoxical kinesis. However, little is known about motivational modulation of movement speed beyond these extreme circumstances. In particular, it is not known if motivational factors affect movement speed by improving movement preparation/initiation or execution (or both) and how this effect relates to the patients' medication state. In the present study, we tested if provision of motivational incentive through monetary reward would speed-up movement initiation and/or execution in Parkinson's disease patients and if this effect depended on dopaminergic medication. We studied the effect of monetary incentive on simple reaction time in 11 Parkinson's disease patients both "off" and "on" dopaminergic medication and in 11 healthy participants. The simple reaction time task was performed across unrewarded and rewarded blocks. The initiation time and movement time were quantified separately. Anticipation errors and long responses were also recorded. The prospect of reward improved initiation times in Parkinson's disease patients both "off" and "on" dopaminergic medication, to a similar extent as in healthy participants. However, for "off" medication, this improvement was associated with increased frequency of anticipation errors, which were eliminated by dopamine replacement. Dopamine replacement had an additional, albeit small effect, on reward-related improvement of movement execution. Motivational strategies are helpful in overcoming bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease. Motivational factors may have a greater effect on bradykinesia when patients are "on" medication, as dopamine appears to be required for overcoming speed-accuracy trade-off and for improvement of movement execution. Thus, medication status should be an important consideration in movement rehabilitation programmes for patients with Parkinson's disease.

Type: Article
Title: Motivational modulation of bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease off and on dopaminergic medication.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00415-014-7315-x
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-014-7315-x
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2014. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1426254
Downloads since deposit
153Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item