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Role of phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase in cell transformation and control of the actin cytoskeleton by Ras

RodriguezViciana, P; Warne, PH; Khwaja, A; Marte, BM; Pappin, D; Das, P; ... Downward, J; + view all (1997) Role of phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase in cell transformation and control of the actin cytoskeleton by Ras. CELL , 89 (3) 457 - 467.

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Abstract

The pathways by which mammalian Ras proteins induce cortical actin rearrangement and cause cellular transformation are investigated using partial loss of function mutants of Ras and activated and inhibitory forms of various postulated target enzymes for Ras. Efficient transformation by Ras requires activation of other direct effecters in addition to the MAP kinase kinase kinase Raf and is inhibited by inactivation of the PI 3-kinase pathway. Actin rearrangement correlates with the ability of Ras mutants to activate PI 3-kinase. Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity blocks Ras induction of membrane ruffling, while activated PI 3-kinase is sufficient to induce membrane ruffling, acting through Rac. The ability of activated Ras to stimulate PI 3-kinase in addition to Raf is therefore important in Ras transformation of mammalian cells and essential in Ras-induced cytoskeletal reorganization.

Type:Article
Title:Role of phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase in cell transformation and control of the actin cytoskeleton by Ras
Keywords:EPIDERMAL GROWTH-FACTOR, PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL 3-KINASE, ACTIVATION, BINDING, RHO, PROTEINS, INDUCTION
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of)
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Wolfson Institute and Cancer Institute Administration > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Cancer Biology
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Wolfson Institute and Cancer Institute Administration > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Haematology

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