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Adenovirus-mediated delivery and expression of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor gene to BEAS-2B epithelial cells abolishes the anti-inflammatory effects of rolipram, salbutamol, and prostaglandin E2: a comparison with H-89.

Meja, KK; Catley, MC; Cambridge, LM; Barnes, PJ; Lum, H; Newton, R; Giembycz, MA; (2004) Adenovirus-mediated delivery and expression of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor gene to BEAS-2B epithelial cells abolishes the anti-inflammatory effects of rolipram, salbutamol, and prostaglandin E2: a comparison with H-89. J Pharmacol Exp Ther , 309 (2) pp. 833-844. 10.1124/jpet.103.060020.

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Abstract

cAMP-elevating drugs are thought to mediate their biological effects by activating the cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) cascade. However, this hypothesis is difficult to confirm due to a lack of selective inhibitors. Here, we have probed the role of PKA in mediating inhibitory effects of several cAMP-elevating drugs in BEAS-2B epithelial cells using an adenovirus vector encoding a PKA inhibitor protein (PKIalpha) and have compared it to H-89, a commonly used small molecule PKA inhibitor. Initial studies established efficient gene transfer and confirmed functionality of PKIalpha 48 h after virus infection. All cAMP-elevating drugs tested promoted the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), activated a cAMP response element (CRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene, and suppressed both granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) generation and [(3)H]arachidonic acid (AA) release in response to interleukin-1beta and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, respectively. These effects were abolished by PKIalpha. In contrast, H-89 behaved unpredictably under the same conditions. Thus, although CREB phosphorylation evoked by a range of cAMP-elevating drugs was abolished by H-89, neither activation of the CRE-dependent luciferase reporter gene construct nor the inhibition of GM-CSF generation was inhibited. Paradoxically, H-89 antagonized MCP-1-induced [(3)H]AA release and enhanced the inhibitory effect of submaximal concentrations of rolipram and 8-bromo-cAMP. We suggest that expression of PKIalpha in susceptible cells provides a simple and unambiguous way to assess the role of PKA in cAMP signaling and to probe the mechanism of action of other drugs and cAMP-dependent responses where the participation of PKA is equivocal. Furthermore, these data suggest that H-89 is not a selective inhibitor of PKA and should be avoided.

Type: Article
Title: Adenovirus-mediated delivery and expression of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor gene to BEAS-2B epithelial cells abolishes the anti-inflammatory effects of rolipram, salbutamol, and prostaglandin E2: a comparison with H-89.
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1124/jpet.103.060020
Keywords: Activating Transcription Factor 1, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Adenosine Monophosphate, Adenoviridae, Albuterol, Animals, Arachidonic Acid, Carrier Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, DNA-Binding Proteins, Dinoprostone, Drug Interactions, Epithelial Cells, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Transfer Techniques, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor, Humans, Isoquinolines, Phosphorylation, Rabbits, Rolipram, Sulfonamides, Transcription Factors, Tritium
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Haematology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1423372
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