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Convincing State-Builders? Disaggregating Internal Legitimacy in Abkhazia

Bakke, KM; O'Loughlin, J; Toal, G; Ward, MD; (2013) Convincing State-Builders? Disaggregating Internal Legitimacy in Abkhazia. International Studies Quarterly -. 10.1111/isqu.12110. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

De facto states, functional on the ground but unrecognized by most states, have long been black boxes for systematic empirical research. This study investigates de facto states’ internal legitimacy—people's confidence in the entity itself, the regime, and institutions. While internal legitimacy is important for any state, it is particularly important for de facto states, whose lack of external legitimacy has made internal legitimacy integral to their quest for recognition. We propose that the internal legitimacy of de facto states depends on how convincing they are to their “citizens” as state-builders. Using original data from a 2010 survey in Abkhazia, we examine this argument based on respondent perceptions of security, welfare, and democracy. Our findings suggest that internal legitimacy is shaped by the key Weberian state-building function of monopoly of the legitimate use of force, as well as these entities’ ability to fulfill other aspects of the social contract.

Type: Article
Title: Convincing State-Builders? Disaggregating Internal Legitimacy in Abkhazia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/isqu.12110
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/isqu.12110
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Dept of Political Science
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1421078
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