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Tourette's syndrome: a cross sectional study to examine the PANDAS hypothesis

Church, AJ; Dale, RC; Lees, AJ; Giovannoni, G; Robertson, MM; (2003) Tourette's syndrome: a cross sectional study to examine the PANDAS hypothesis. J NEUROL NEUROSUR PS , 74 (5) 602 - 607.

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Abstract

Background: The classical neurological disorder after group A beta haemolytic streptococcal infection is Sydenham's chorea. Recently a tic disorder occurring after group A streptococcal infection has been described and termed PANDAS ( paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection). It is proposed that antibodies induced after group A streptococcal infection react with basal ganglia neurones in Sydenham's chorea and PANDAS. Anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) are present in most cases of acute Sydenham's chorea, but rarely in controls.Objective: To investigate the hypothesis that Tourette's syndrome may be associated with group A streptococcal infection and ABGA.Methods: 100 patients with Tourette's syndrome (DSM-IV-TR) were enrolled in a cross sectional study. Children with neurological disease (n = 50) and recent uncomplicated streptococcal infection ( n = 40), adults with neurological disease ( n = 50), and healthy adults ( n = 50) were studied as controls. Recent group A streptococcal infection was defined using antistreptolysin O titre (ASOT). ABGA were detected using western immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence.Results: ASOT was raised in 64% of children with Tourette's syndrome compared with 15% of paediatric neurological disease controls (p < 0.0001), and in 68% of adults with Tourette's syndrome compared with 12% of adult neurological controls and 8% of adult healthy controls (p < 0.05). Western immunoblotting showed positive binding in 20% of children and 27% of adults with Tourette's syndrome, compared with 2-4% of control groups ( p < 0.05). The most common basal ganglia binding was to a 60 kDa antigen, similar to the proposed antigen in Sydenham's chorea. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed autoantibody binding to basal ganglia neurones. Serological evidence of recent group A streptococcal infection, assessed by a raised ASOT, was detected in 91% (21/23) of Tourette's syndrome patients with positive ABGA compared with 57% (44/77) with negative ABGA (p < 0.01).Conclusions: The results support a role of group A streptococcal infection and basal ganglia autoimmunity in a subgroup of patients with Tourette's syndrome and suggest a pathogenic similarity between Sydenham's chorea and some patients with Tourette's syndrome.

Type: Article
Title: Tourette's syndrome: a cross sectional study to examine the PANDAS hypothesis
Keywords: OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER, PERSISTENT SYDENHAMS CHOREA, STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, ANTINEURONAL ANTIBODIES, STRIATAL ANTIBODIES, RHEUMATIC-FEVER, TIC DISORDERS, CHILDREN, PREVALENCE, SYMPTOMS
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/141594
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