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Renegotiation of the WTO Agreement on Agriculture: Accommodating the New Big Issues

Smith, F; Cardwell, MN; (2013) Renegotiation of the WTO Agreement on Agriculture: Accommodating the New Big Issues. International and Comparative Law Quarterly , 62 (4) pp. 865-898. 10.1017/S0020589313000341.

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Abstract

The WTO Agreement on Agriculture was designed to maximize trade flows at a time of surplus agricultural production. It required Members to open markets and to reduce domestic and export subsidies. Proposals for reform in the Doha Round negotiations largely adopt the same pattern. Yet, as surplus is replaced by shortage, Members are increasingly concerned about food security and the impact of agriculture on climate change. And contemporary agricultural policies crystallize around ‘sustainable intensification’, where domestic production is promoted, but not at the expense of future production. This article suggests that, although both the Agreement on Agriculture and the Doha Round proposals do provide some scope for measures to address this new policy paradigm, there are instances where they may work actively against it.

Type: Article
Title: Renegotiation of the WTO Agreement on Agriculture: Accommodating the New Big Issues
DOI: 10.1017/S0020589313000341
Publisher version: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstra...
Keywords: climate change, Doha Round Negotiations, domestic support, export competition, export prohibitions and restrictions, food security, market access, sustainable intensification, WTO Agreement on Agriculture
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Laws
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1413069
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