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The effect of lactate-buffered solutions on the acid-base status of patients with renal failure.

Davenport, A; Will, EJ; Davison, AM; (1989) The effect of lactate-buffered solutions on the acid-base status of patients with renal failure. Nephrol Dial Transplant , 4 (9) pp. 800-804.

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Abstract

We investigated the effect of an exogenous lactate load given during intermittent machine haemofiltration to three groups of patients with renal failure: those with dialysis-dependent end-stage renal failure (6 patients) and those with either acute renal (8 patients) and/or acute hepatorenal failure (6 patients). As expected, the hepatorenal group exhibited the greatest degree of hyperlactataemia, and this was associated with the development of a metabolic acidosis. There were correlations between the maximum blood lactate measured during treatment and the increase in arterial hydrogen ion concentration (r = 0.76, P less than 0.001), and between the decrease in serum bicarbonate (r = 0.89, P less than 0.001) and the mean arterial blood pressure prior to treatment (r = -0.57, P = 0.003). This suggests that hyperlactataemia is not as benign as previously thought and that lactate-buffered fluids should be used with care in patients with hepatorenal failure and cardiovascular instability.

Type: Article
Title: The effect of lactate-buffered solutions on the acid-base status of patients with renal failure.
Location: England
Keywords: Acid-Base Imbalance, Acute Kidney Injury, Adult, Aged, Buffers, Female, Hemofiltration, Hepatorenal Syndrome, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Lactates, Male, Middle Aged
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1412786
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