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Forgoing life support: how the decision is made in European pediatric intensive care units

Devictor, DJ; Latour, JM; (2011) Forgoing life support: how the decision is made in European pediatric intensive care units. Intensive Care Medicine , 37 (11) pp. 1881-1887. 10.1007/s00134-011-2357-3.

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Abstract

The decision to forgo life-sustaining treatment was made in 166 (40.6%) out of 409 deceased children (median 42.9%, France 38.2%, N/W European countries 60.0%, E/C European countries 0%; P < 0.001). In the E/C group, more patients died after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) failure than after forgoing life support (P < 0.001). In all PICUs, caregivers discussed the decision during a formal meeting, after which the medical staff made the final decision. The decision was often documented in the medical record (median 100%). The majority of the parents were informed of the final decision and were at the bedside during their child's death (median 100%). Decision to forgo life-sustaining treatment occurred in 40.6% of children, compared with 33% in Eurydice I. A high percentage of parents from France were now informed about the meeting and its conclusion as compared with Eurydice I (median 100%).

Type: Article
Title: Forgoing life support: how the decision is made in European pediatric intensive care units
DOI: 10.1007/s00134-011-2357-3
UCL classification: UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Child Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1410369
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