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Bidirectional Best Hits Miss Many Orthologs in Duplication-Rich Clades such as Plants and Animals.

Dalquen, DA; Dessimoz, C; (2013) Bidirectional Best Hits Miss Many Orthologs in Duplication-Rich Clades such as Plants and Animals. Genome Biology and Evolution , 5 (10) pp. 1800-1806. 10.1093/gbe/evt132. Green open access

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Abstract

Bidirectional best hits (BBH), which entails identifying the pairs of genes in two di.erent genomes that are more similar to each other than either is to any other gene in the other genome, is a simple and widely used method to infer orthology. A recent study has analysed the link between BBH and orthology in bacteria and archaea and concluded that, given the very high consistency in BBH they observed among triplets of neighboring genes, a high proportion of BBH are likely to be bona fide orthologs. However, limited by their analysis setup, the previous study could not easily test the reverse question: which proportion of orthologs are BBH? In this follow-up study, we consider this question in theory and answer it based on conceptual arguments, simulated data, and real biological data from all three domains of life. Our analyses corroborate the findings of the previous study, but also show that because of the high rate of gene duplication in plants and animals, as much as 60% of orthologous relations are missed by the BBH criterion.

Type: Article
Title: Bidirectional Best Hits Miss Many Orthologs in Duplication-Rich Clades such as Plants and Animals.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evt132
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evt132
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1405553
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