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New technology and planning: reflections on rapid change and the culture of planning in the post-industrial age

Batty, M; (1991) New technology and planning: reflections on rapid change and the culture of planning in the post-industrial age. Town Planning Review , 62 (3) pp. 269-294. 10.3828/tpr.62.3.h60tj04147615726.

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Abstract

Attempts to review the response of planners and the planning system in Britain to the pervasive effect of new technology during the last 40 yr. It is argued that the planning system which had emerged in Britain by the early 1950s was in direct response to problems of industrialisation and that just as the system began to influence urban development, Western and British society began its abrupt transition to the post-industrial age. Into this milieu came new technology whose short history has been equally turbulent, usually out of phase with the problems to which it has been addressed. Here we confound technology with technique, showing how a concern for large-scale thinking and modelling in the 1960s has turned into much more pragmatic uses of computers for routine functions such as office automation and development control in the 1980s. These developments are reviewed by cataloguing the sorts of software used in education and practice. The article concludes by identifying key problems in education and practice, and by focusing on the crucial dilemma in training a future generation of planners able to rise above the current and traditional response of rejecting any new technology out-of-hand. -from Author

Type: Article
Title: New technology and planning: reflections on rapid change and the culture of planning in the post-industrial age
DOI: 10.3828/tpr.62.3.h60tj04147615726
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1393060
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