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Integration of scaffolds into full-thickness skin wounds: the connexin response.

Gilmartin, DJ; Alexaline, MM; Thrasivoulou, C; Phillips, AR; Jayasinghe, SN; Becker, DL; (2013) Integration of scaffolds into full-thickness skin wounds: the connexin response. Adv Healthc Mater , 2 (8) 1151 - 1160. 10.1002/adhm.201200357.

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Abstract

Scaffolds have been reported to promote healing of hard-to-heal wounds such as burns and chronic ulcers. However, there has been little investigation into the cell biology of wound edge tissues in response to the scaffolds. Here, we assess the impact of collagen scaffolds on mouse full-thickness wound re-epithelialisation during the first 5 days of healing. We find that scaffolds impede wound re-epithelialisation, inducing a bulbous thickening of the wound edge epidermis as opposed to the thin tongue of migratory keratinocytes seen in normal wound healing. Scaffolds also increase the inflammatory response and the numbers of neutrophils in and around the wound. These effects were also produced by scaffolds made of alginate in the form of fibers and microspheres, but not as an alginate hydrogel. In addition, we find the gap junction protein connexin 43, which normally down-regulates at the wound edge during re-epithelialisation, to be up-regulated in the bulbous epidermal wound edge. Incorporation of connexin 43 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides into the scaffold can be performed to reduce inflammation whilst promoting scaffold biocompatibility.

Type: Article
Title: Integration of scaffolds into full-thickness skin wounds: the connexin response.
Location: Germany
DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200357
Language: English
Keywords: bioactivation, connexin 43, gap junctions, scaffolds, wound healing, Alginates, Animals, Cell Movement, Collagen, Connexin 43, Glucuronic Acid, Hexuronic Acids, Keratinocytes, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred ICR, Microspheres, Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Antisense, Polymers, Skin, Tissue Scaffolds, Wound Healing
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Cell and Developmental Biology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1386500
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