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Working with schools and children’s wider social environment

Fuggle, P; Dunsmuir, S; (2013) Working with schools and children’s wider social environment. In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Children and Families, Third Edition. (pp. 126-142).

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Abstract

© Cambridge University Press 1998, 2005, 2013. Introduction Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is a framework which examines the relationship between an individual’s cognitions, emotions and behaviour within a particular context. The influence of ecological systems on human development (Bronfenbrenner, 1979) is widely acknowledged and it is therefore important to take into account environmental factors and the service context in which CBT is delivered when working with children and their families. In this chapter, we will suggest that schools and other community settings provide appropriate contexts for delivering CBT and propose some guiding principles for integrated, coherent CBT practice across contexts. Children live within multiple environmental systems. These include their family, school and other systems to which the child is exposed (e.g. local community, church). Within each system are roles, norms and rules which shape development. Family arrangements are varied and idiosyncratic, yet an important common theme is that children’s relationships with their parents and siblings have a primary and significant influence on their growth and development (Lamb et al., 1999). There are many economic and societal pressures that have led to changes in family organisation in developed countries, for example those associated with increased maternal employment (Joshi et al., 2009). This has had a direct impact on the amount of time that children spend at home in their early years, with increasing numbers attending day-care provision such as nurseries and children’s centres – alternative ecological systems. When children in the UK reach statutory school age at 5, attendance in full-time education is compulsory. The school and educational system also exert a strong influence on social development – positive relationships with teachers and peers, along with parents, are powerful determinants of psychological well-being (Rutter, 1991). Therefore, in cases where children and young people are experiencing psychological distress, schools can be powerful partners with families in supporting interventions such as CBT and contributing to the process of building resilience in vulnerable children (Rutter, 1990; Department for Education, 2011).

Type: Book chapter
Title: Working with schools and children’s wider social environment
ISBN-13: 9781107689855
DOI: 10.1017/CBO9781139344456.013
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1383251
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