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Is undergraduate otorhinolaryngology teaching relevant to junior doctors working in accident and emergency departments?

Sharma, A; Machen, K; Clarke, B; Howard, D; (2006) Is undergraduate otorhinolaryngology teaching relevant to junior doctors working in accident and emergency departments? Journal of Laryngology and Otology , 120 (11) 949 - 951. 10.1017/S0022215106002246. Green open access

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Abstract

Undergraduate ENT teaching provides junior doctors with skills and knowledge useful for the practice of medicine. However, ENT has been removed from the curriculum of nine of the 29 medical schools in the United Kingdom, as it was not deemed relevant to general medical practice. A telephone survey was performed of 20 senior house officers working in accident and emergency (A&E) departments across the United Kingdom. The results showed that 90 per cent felt their undergraduate ENT teaching was directly beneficial to working in A&E, 75 per cent felt they had not received enough undergraduate ENT teaching and 45 per cent currently received no postgraduate teaching whilst working in A&E. These results illustrate the importance of ENT teaching in the undergraduate curriculum and its value to practising doctors. They highlight the fact that prospective studies are required to examine the effect on junior doctors of changing the curriculum.

Type: Article
Title: Is undergraduate otorhinolaryngology teaching relevant to junior doctors working in accident and emergency departments?
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0022215106002246
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022215106002246
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright Cambridge University Press 2006
Keywords: Attitude of Health Personnel, Education, Medical, Graduate, Education, Medical, Undergraduate, Emergency Service, Hospital, Great Britain, Humans, Medical Staff, Hospital, Otolaryngology
UCL classification: UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Science and Technology Studies
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/138243
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