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What features improve the accuracy of clinical diagnosis in Parkinson's disease: a clinicopathologic study.

Hughes, AJ; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Daniel, SE; Lees, AJ; (1992) What features improve the accuracy of clinical diagnosis in Parkinson's disease: a clinicopathologic study. Neurology , 42 (6) pp. 1142-1146. 10.1212/wnl.42.6.1142.

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Abstract

Many authorities have drawn attention to the difficulties in clinically distinguishing Parkinson's disease (PD) from other parkinsonian syndromes. We assessed the clinical features of 100 patients diagnosed prospectively by a group of consultant neurologists as having idiopathic PD according to their pathologic findings. Seventy-six percent of these cases were confirmed to have PD. By using selected criteria (asymmetrical onset, no atypical features, and no possible etiology for another parkinsonian syndrome) the proportion of true PD cases identified was increased to 93%, but 32% of pathologically confirmed cases were rejected on this basis. These observations suggest that studies based on consultant diagnosis of PD, using standard diagnostic criteria, will include cases other than PD, thus distorting results from clinical trials and epidemiologic studies. The strict use of additional criteria can reduce misdiagnosis but at the cost of excluding genuine PD cases.

Type: Article
Title: What features improve the accuracy of clinical diagnosis in Parkinson's disease: a clinicopathologic study.
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1212/wnl.42.6.1142
Keywords: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Parkinson Disease, Parkinson Disease, Secondary, Predictive Value of Tests, Regression Analysis, Sensitivity and Specificity
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1379989
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