UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging in fetuses, children and adults: A systematic review

Thayyil, S; Chandrasekaran, M; Chitty, LS; Wade, A; Skordis-Worrall, J; Bennett-Britton, I; Cohen, M; ... Taylor, AM; + view all (2010) Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging in fetuses, children and adults: A systematic review. EUR J RADIOL , 75 (1) E142 - E148. 10.1016/j.ejrad.2009.10.007.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

To determine, in a systematic review, the diagnostic accuracy, acceptability and cost-effectiveness of less invasive autopsy by post-mortem MR imaging, in fetuses, children and adults. We searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane library and reference lists to identify all studies comparing post-mortem MR imaging with conventional autopsy, published between January 1990 and March 2009. 539 abstracts were identified; 15 papers met the inclusion criteria; data from 9 studies were extracted (total: 146 fetuses, 11 children and 24 adults). In accurately identifying the final cause of death or most clinically significant abnormality, post-mortem MR imaging had a sensitivity and specificity of 69% (95% CI-56%, 80%) and 95% (95% CI-88%, 98%) in fetuses, and 28% (95% CI-13%, 47%) and 64% (95% CI-23%, 94%) in children and adults, respectively; however the published data is limited to small, heterogenous and poorly designed studies. Insufficient data is available on acceptability and economic evaluation of post-mortem MR imaging. Well designed, large, prospective studies are required to evaluate the accuracy of post-mortem MR imaging, before it can be offered as a clinical tool. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging in fetuses, children and adults: A systematic review
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2009.10.007
Keywords: Sensitivity, Specificity, Magnetic resonance imaging, Autopsy, Economic evaluation, Costing, Parental attitudes, Systematic review, CONVENTIONAL AUTOPSY, PARENTAL CONSENT, INVASIVE AUTOPSY, FETAL ANOMALIES, MRI, NECROPSY, ADJUNCT, ULTRASOUND, DEATH
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health > Neonatology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Children's Cardiovascular Disease
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Pop, Policy and Practice Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/137978
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item