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Looking into myself: changes in interoceptive sensitivity during mirror self-observation.

Ainley, V; Tajadura-Jiménez, A; Fotopoulou, A; Tsakiris, M; (2012) Looking into myself: changes in interoceptive sensitivity during mirror self-observation. Psychophysiology , 49 (11) 1504 - 1508. 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2012.01468.x.

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Abstract

Interoceptive sensitivity is an essential component of recent models of "the self." Increased focus on the self (e.g., self-observation in a mirror) can enhance aspects of self-processing. We examined whether self-observation also enhances interoceptive sensitivity. Participants performed a heartbeat detection task while looking at their own face in a mirror or at a black screen. There was significant improvement in interoceptive sensitivity in the mirror condition for those participants with lower interoceptive sensitivity at baseline. This effect was independent of the order of conditions, gender, age, body mass index, habitual exercise, and changes in heart rate. Our results suggest that self-observation may represent a viable way of manipulating individuals' interoceptive sensitivity, in order to directly test causal relations between interoceptive sensitivity and exteroceptive self-processing.

Type:Article
Title:Looking into myself: changes in interoceptive sensitivity during mirror self-observation.
Location:United States
DOI:10.1111/j.1469-8986.2012.01468.x
Language:English
Additional information:PMCID: PMC3755258
Keywords:Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Child, Female, Heart Rate, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Self Concept, Sensation, Young Adult
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > UCL Interaction Centre

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