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The Micromorphology of Tree Subsoil Hollows: Their Significance to Soil Science and Archaeology

Macphail, RI; Goldberg, P; (1990) The Micromorphology of Tree Subsoil Hollows: Their Significance to Soil Science and Archaeology. Developments in Soil Science , 19 (C) pp. 425-429. 10.1016/S0166-2481(08)70357-X.

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Abstract

Tree throw is thought to cause subsoil features and the turbation of the original soil horizonation. Ironically, there are only few micromorphological studies of modern examples whereas archaeological ones are more common. Three have been selected here. At two of the sites classic tree throw features occur in the field, whereas at the third (Brean Down) only a shallow soil is apparent. The combination of micromorphology and molluscan studies at Balksbury suggested that natural tree throw left soil hollows to infill slowly, allowing strong homogenisation by biological activity of the originally mixed soil material. At Irthlingborough, trees were burned in situ after being killed and possibly pulled down or left to topple naturally, and the turbation fabrics were preserved by baking. At Brean Down, there is also evidence for prehistoric clearance although no subsoil hollows are present in the field. © 1990.

Type: Article
Title: The Micromorphology of Tree Subsoil Hollows: Their Significance to Soil Science and Archaeology
DOI: 10.1016/S0166-2481(08)70357-X
UCL classification: UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences
UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences > Institute of Archaeology
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URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1373787
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