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Beyond the colour of my skin: how skin colour affects the sense of body-ownership.

Farmer, H; Tajadura-Jiménez, A; Tsakiris, M; (2012) Beyond the colour of my skin: how skin colour affects the sense of body-ownership. Conscious Cogn , 21 (3) 1242 - 1256. 10.1016/j.concog.2012.04.011.

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Abstract

Multisensory stimulation has been shown to alter the sense of body-ownership. Given that perceived similarity between one's own body and those of others is crucial for social cognition, we investigated whether multisensory stimulation can lead participants to experience ownership over a hand of different skin colour. Results from two studies using introspective, behavioural and physiological methods show that, following synchronous visuotactile (VT) stimulation, participants can experience body-ownership over hands that seem to belong to a different racial group. Interestingly, a baseline measure of implicit racial bias did not predict whether participants would experience the RHI, but the overall strength of experienced body-ownership seemed to predict the participants' post-illusion implicit racial bias with those who experienced a stronger RHI showing a lower bias. These findings suggest that multisensory experiences can override strict ingroup/outgroup distinctions based on skin colour and point to a key role for sensory processing in social cognition.

Type:Article
Title:Beyond the colour of my skin: how skin colour affects the sense of body-ownership.
Location:United States
DOI:10.1016/j.concog.2012.04.011
Language:English
Additional information:PMCID: PMC3772504
Keywords:Adult, Body Image, Continental Population Groups, Female, Galvanic Skin Response, Humans, Illusions, Judgment, Male, Ownership, Prejudice, Proprioception, Self Concept, Skin Pigmentation, Visual Perception, Young Adult
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > UCL Interaction Centre

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