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Promising development from translational or perhaps anti-translational research in breast cancer.

Retsky, M; Demicheli, R; Hrushesky, WJ; Forget, P; De Kock, M; Gukas, I; Rogers, RA; ... Vaidya, JS; + view all (2012) Promising development from translational or perhaps anti-translational research in breast cancer. Clin Transl Med , 1 (1) 17-. 10.1186/2001-1326-1-17.

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Abstract

UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: A great deal of the public's money has been spent on cancer research but demonstrable benefits to patients have not been proportionate. We are a group of scientists and physicians who several decades ago were confronted with bimodal relapse patterns among early stage breast cancer patients who were treated by mastectomy. Since the bimodal pattern was not explainable with the then well-accepted continuous growth model, we proposed that metastatic disease was mostly inactive before surgery but was driven into growth somehow by surgery. Most relapses in breast cancer would fall into the surgery-induced growth category thus it was highly important to understand the ramifications of this process and how it may be curtailed. With this hypothesis, we have been able to explain a wide variety of clinical observations including why mammography is less effective for women age 40-49 than it is for women age 50-59, why adjuvant chemotherapy is most effective for premenopausal women with positive lymph nodes, and why there is a racial disparity in outcome. METHODS: We have been diligently looking for new clinical or laboratory information that could provide a connection or correlation between the bimodal relapse pattern and some clinical factor or interventional action and perhaps lead us towards methods to prevent surgery-initiated tumor activity. RESULTS: A recent development occurred when a retrospective study appeared in an anesthesiology journal that suggested the perioperative NSAID analgesic ketorolac seems to reduce early relapses following mastectomy. Collaborating with these anesthesiologists to understand this effect, we independently re-examined and updated their data and, in search of a mechanism, focused in on the transient systemic inflammation that follows surgery to remove a primary tumor. We have arrived at several possible explanations ranging from mechanical to biological that suggest the relapses avoided in the early years do not show up later. CONCLUSIONS: We present the possibility that a nontoxic and low cost intervention could prevent early relapses. It may be that preventing systemic inflammation post surgery will prevent early relapses. This could be controlled by the surgical anesthesiologist's choice of analgesic drugs. This development needs to be confirmed in a randomized controlled clinical trial and we have identified triple negative breast cancer as the ideal subset with which to test this. If successful, this would be relatively easy to implement in developing as well as developed countries and would be an important translational result.

Type: Article
Title: Promising development from translational or perhaps anti-translational research in breast cancer.
Location: Germany
DOI: 10.1186/2001-1326-1-17
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1366646
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