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A cross-national study of the stigmatization of severe psychiatric illness: historical review, methodological considerations and development of the questionnaire.

Littlewood, R; Jadhav, S; Ryder, AG; (2007) A cross-national study of the stigmatization of severe psychiatric illness: historical review, methodological considerations and development of the questionnaire. Transcult Psychiatry , 44 (2) 171 - 202. 10.1177/1363461507077720.

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Abstract

Despite their potential significance for public policy and health provision in different societies, popular conceptualizations of and social responses to severe psychiatric illness remain relatively unexamined. Two general research procedures may be identified: (1) the anthropological approach uses ethnographic methods to look at explicit categorizations, and (2) the sociological approach employs quantitative survey methods to examine the public ;stigma' of psychiatric illness. This article reviews methodological and conceptual approaches to the study of stigma and describes the development of an ethnographically grounded questionnaire to examine ;stigmatization' from data in different cultures. The difficulties of achieving cross-cultural comparability of meaning are discussed and the psychometric properties of the instrument are presented.

Type:Article
Title:A cross-national study of the stigmatization of severe psychiatric illness: historical review, methodological considerations and development of the questionnaire.
Location:England
DOI:10.1177/1363461507077720
Language:English
Keywords:Attitude to Health, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Culture, Ethnic Groups, History, 20th Century, History, 21st Century, Humans, Mental Disorders, Psychiatry, Questionnaires, Stereotyping
UCL classification:UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences > Anthropology
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry

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