UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Not doing but thinking: The role of challenge in the gaming experience

Cox, AL; Cairns, P; Carroll, M; Shah, P; (2012) Not doing but thinking: The role of challenge in the gaming experience. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. (pp. 79 - 88).

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Previous research into the experience of videogames has shown the importance of the role of challenge in producing a good experience. However, defining exactly which challenges are important and which aspects of gaming experience are affected is largely under-explored. In this paper, we investigate if altering the level of challenge in a videogame influences people's experience of immersion. Our first study demonstrates that simply increasing the physical demands of the game by requiring gamers to interact more with the game does not result in increased immersion. In a further two studies, we use time pressure to make games more physically and cognitively challenging. We find that the addition of time pressure increases immersion as predicted. We argue that the level of challenge experienced is an interaction between the level of expertise of the gamer and the cognitive challenge encompassed within the game. Copyright 2012 ACM.

Type:Proceedings paper
Title:Not doing but thinking: The role of challenge in the gaming experience
DOI:10.1145/2207676.2207689
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > UCL Interaction Centre

Archive Staff Only: edit this record