UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

A plausible model of schizophrenia must incorporate psychological and social, as well as neuro developmental, risk factors.

Bramon, E; Murray, RM; (2001) A plausible model of schizophrenia must incorporate psychological and social, as well as neuro developmental, risk factors. Dialogues Clin Neurosci , 3 (4) pp. 243-256.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Subtle alterations in brain development caused by genes or early environmental hazards, such as obstetric complications, play a role in projecting some individuals on a trajectory toward schizophrenia. High-risk and cohort studies demonstrate that children destined to develop schizophrenia tend to have delayed milestones and subtle neuromotor and cognitive impairments (particularly in coordination and language). These neurocognitive problems lead to difficulties in interpersonal relations, and their progressive alienation makes these at-risk children more likely to harbor odd or paranoid ideas. This cascade of increasingly deviant development may then be compounded by brain maturational changes during adolescence with a resultant lability of the dopaminergic response to stress. As a result, the individual is more susceptible to the effects of the abuse of dopamine-releasing drugs, and to other risk factors such as migration or stressful life events; social isolation may be a common pathway underlying several of the social risk factors.

Type: Article
Title: A plausible model of schizophrenia must incorporate psychological and social, as well as neuro developmental, risk factors.
Location: France
Keywords: genes, imaging, neurodevelopment, prenatal risk factor, relatives, risk factor, schizophrenia
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1361824
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item