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Investigation of a “déjà vécu” delusion in a single case with matched controls

Turner, M; (2012) Investigation of a “déjà vécu” delusion in a single case with matched controls. Doctoral thesis, UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Aims: To evaluate the use of external aids in cognitive rehabilitation for memory impairment in patients with acquired brain injury resulting from TBI and stroke. Methods: Studies evaluating external aids published up to 2008 were extracted from the systematic reviews of cognitive rehabilitation by Cicerone and colleagues (Cicerone et al., 2000, 2005, 2011). In addition Medline, PschINFO and CINAHLPlus were searched from 2008 up to March 2012. The reference lists of relevant articles were scanned to identify any additional studies. Results: 39 studies were reviewed. 12 studies evaluated paper-based aids and 27 studies evaluated electronic aids. All studies reported improvements in memory functioning associated with use of an external aid, although only one study directly compared an external memory aid to alternative memory interventions. Conclusions: External aids are an effective tool in the rehabilitation of memory impairment following TBI and stroke. Further research is required to explore whether particular aids are differentially suited to particular types of patient or memory problem, and to explore the factors that are predictive of sustained use after discharge.

Type:Thesis (Doctoral)
Title:Investigation of a “déjà vécu” delusion in a single case with matched controls
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language:English
Additional information:Thesis in two volumes: volume 2 is restricted
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience

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