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The role of inorganic phosphate in the release of Ca2+ from rat-liver mitochondria.

Roos, I; Crompton, M; Carafoli, E; (1980) The role of inorganic phosphate in the release of Ca2+ from rat-liver mitochondria. Eur J Biochem , 110 (2) pp. 319-325. 10.1111/j.1432-1033.1980.tb04870.x.

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Abstract

The effect of inorganic phosphate on Ca2+ retention has been investigated using phosphate-depleted liver mitchondria. Phosphate induces the release of Ca2+ through an efflux route insensitive to ruthenium red. This effect is not due to functional or structural damage, since mitochondria maintain their membrane potential during phosphate-induced Ca2+ efflux. Direct enzymatic measurement of mitochondria pyridine nucleotides has established that changes in their redox state (i.e. increased oxidation) do not play a role in the phosphate-effect. The phosphate-induced Ca2+ efflux requires transport of phosphate out of mitochondria. However, the fluxes of Ca2+ and phosphate do not coincide: the release of phosphate preceeds that of Ca2+.

Type: Article
Title: The role of inorganic phosphate in the release of Ca2+ from rat-liver mitochondria.
Location: England
DOI: 10.1111/j.1432-1033.1980.tb04870.x
Keywords: Animals, Calcium, Intracellular Membranes, Kinetics, Membrane Potentials, Mitochondria, Liver, Phosphates, Rats, Ruthenium Red
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1347137
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