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Changes in the Frontotemporal Cortex and Cognitive Correlates in First-Episode Psychosis

Gutierrez-Galve, L; Wheeler-Kingshott, CAM; Altmann, DR; Price, G; Chu, EM; Leeson, VC; Lobo, A; ... Ron, MA; + view all (2010) Changes in the Frontotemporal Cortex and Cognitive Correlates in First-Episode Psychosis. Biological Psychiatry , 68 (1) 51 - 60. 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.03.019. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Loss of cortical volume in frontotemporal regions has been reported in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives. Cortical area and thickness are determined by different genetic processes, and measuring these parameters separately may clarify disturbances in corticogenesis relevant to schizophrenia. Our study also explored clinical and cognitive correlates of these parameters.Methods: Thirty-seven patients with first-episode psychosis (34 schizophrenia, 3 schizoaffective disorder) and 38 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex took part in the study. Imaging was performed on an magnetic resonance imaging 1.5-T scanner. Area and thickness of the frontotemporal cortex were measured using a surface-based morphometry method (Freesurfer). All subjects underwent neuropsychologic testing that included measures of premorbid and current IQ, working and verbal memory, and executive function.Results: Reductions in cortical area, more marked in the temporal cortex, were present in patients. Overall frontotemporal cortical thickness did not differ between groups, although regional thinning of the right superior temporal region was observed in patients. There was a significant association of both premorbid IQ and IQ at disease onset with area, but not thickness, of the frontotemporal cortex, and working memory span was associated with area of the frontal cortex. These associations remained significant when only patients with schizophrenia were considered.Conclusions: Our results suggest an early disruption of corticogenesis in schizophrenia, although the effect of subsequent environmental factors cannot be excluded. In addition, cortical abnormalities are subject to regional variations and differ from those present in neurodegenerative diseases.

Type: Article
Title: Changes in the Frontotemporal Cortex and Cognitive Correlates in First-Episode Psychosis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.03.019
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.03.019
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY License. This license allows for redistribution and alteration, commercial and non-commercial, as long as credit is given to the author.
Keywords: Cognitive impairment, cortical area and thickness, first-episode psychosis, frontotemporal cortex, magnetic resonance imaging, surface-based morphometry, ADOLESCENT-ONSET SCHIZOPHRENIA, GRAY-MATTER ABNORMALITIES, SURFACE-BASED ANALYSIS, HUMAN CEREBRAL-CORTEX, CORTICAL THICKNESS, BRAIN VOLUME, HIGH-RISK, LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION, ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE, GENETIC INFLUENCES
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1336129
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