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Black Petrels (Procellaria parkinsoni) patrol the ocean shelf-break: GPS tracking of a vulnerable procellariiform seabird.

Freeman, R; Dennis, T; Landers, T; Thompson, D; Bell, E; Walker, M; Guilford, T; (2010) Black Petrels (Procellaria parkinsoni) patrol the ocean shelf-break: GPS tracking of a vulnerable procellariiform seabird. PLOS One , 5 (2) , Article e9236. 10.1371/journal.pone.0009236. Green open access

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Abstract

Determining the foraging movements of pelagic seabirds is fundamental for their conservation. However, the vulnerability and elusive lifestyles of these animals have made them notoriously difficult to study. Recent developments in satellite telemetry have enabled tracking of smaller seabirds during foraging excursions.

Type: Article
Title: Black Petrels (Procellaria parkinsoni) patrol the ocean shelf-break: GPS tracking of a vulnerable procellariiform seabird.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009236
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0009236
Language: English
Additional information: © 2010 Freeman et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Financial support was kindly provided by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (grant number: GR/S58119/01, http://www.epsrc.ac.uk), Microsoft Research (http://research.microsoft.com) and Merton College, Oxford (http://www.merton.ox.ac.uk). The corresponding author is currently employed at Microsoft Research as a post-doctoral researcher, but aside from this none of these funders had any role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Keywords: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Birds, Ecosystem, Feeding Behavior, Female, Flight, Animal, Geography, Male, New Zealand, Oceans and Seas, Predatory Behavior, Telemetry, Time Factors
UCL classification: UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > CoMPLEX - Maths and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1333090
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