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Assembly, tuning, and transfer of action systems in infants and robots

Berthouze, L; Goldfield, EC; (2008) Assembly, tuning, and transfer of action systems in infants and robots. INFANT CHILD DEV , 17 (1) 25 - 42. 10.1002/icd.542.

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Abstract

This paper seeks to foster a discussion on whether experiments with robots can inform theory in infant motor development and specifically (1) how the interactions among the parts of a system, including the nervous and musculoskeletal systems and the forces acting on the body, induce organizational changes in the whole, and (2) how exploratory behaviour and selective informational signals at the timescale of skill learning may allow behaviour to become stabilized at the longer timescale of development. The paper describes how three generative principles, inspired from developmental biology and shown to underlie the dynamics of infants learning to bounce in a Jolly Jumper, were broken into a set of mechanisms suitable for controlling a robotic system and resulted in a similar developmental profile. A comparison of infant and robot data leads to a set of criteria for improving the usefulness of robotic studies. Copyright (C) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Type: Article
Title: Assembly, tuning, and transfer of action systems in infants and robots
DOI: 10.1002/icd.542
Keywords: motor development, evo devo, dynamical systems, synthetic approach, infants, robots, SKILL ACQUISITION, DYNAMICS, MOVEMENT, COORDINATION, PERCEPTION, BEHAVIOR, FREEDOM, MODELS, TASK
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1320608
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