UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Hyper IgE in New Zealand black mice due to a dominant-negative CD23 mutation

Lewis, G; Rapsomaniki, E; Bouriez, T; Crockford, T; Ferry, H; Rigby, R; Vyse, T; ... Cornall, R; + view all (2004) Hyper IgE in New Zealand black mice due to a dominant-negative CD23 mutation. IMMUNOGENETICS , 56 (8) 564 - 571. 10.1007/s00251-004-0728-4.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) plays a critical role in both resistance to parasitic infection and allergy to environmental antigens. The IgE response is in turn regulated by the B-cell co-receptor CD23, and CD23-deficient mice show exaggerated IgE responses and airway hyper-responsiveness. In this report, we show that New Zealand black (NZB) mice express a variant CD23 allele, with mutations in both the C-lectin-binding domain and stalk region, which fails to bind IgE at high affinity and has reduced expression on the cell surface. Expression of the variant CD23 chain interferes with trimerisation of the receptor and has a dominant-negative effect leading to reduced IgE binding in crosses between NZB and other strains. Genetic mapping shows that the variant CD23 leads to an exaggerated primary IgE response, which is independent of other strain-specific effects. These results suggest that NZB mice or mice carrying the variant allele will be useful models for studying both allergy and quantitative traits associated with atopy. The exaggerated IgE response provides an explanation for the natural resistance of NZB mice to parasitic infection by Leishmania.

Type: Article
Title: Hyper IgE in New Zealand black mice due to a dominant-negative CD23 mutation
DOI: 10.1007/s00251-004-0728-4
Keywords: NZB, IgE, CD23, atopy, Leishmania, AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS, LEISHMANIA-MAJOR, ALLERGIC DISEASE, RECEPTOR, EXPRESSION, RESPONSES, FC-EPSILON-RII/CD23, SUSCEPTIBILITY, SENSITIZATION, INFLAMMATION
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1317149
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item