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Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills?

Joekes, K; Noble, LM; Kubacki, AM; Potts, HWW; Lloyd, M; (2011) Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills? BMC Medical Education , 11 , Article 41. 10.1186/1472-6920-11-41. Green and gold open access

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Abstract

Background: This study investigated whether the introduction of professional development teaching in the first two years of a medical course improved students' observed communication skills with simulated patients. Students' observed communication skills were related to patient-centred attitudes, confidence in communicating with patients and performance in later clinical examinations.Methods: Eighty-two medical students from two consecutive cohorts at a UK medical school completed two videoed consultations with a simulated patient: one at the beginning of year 1 and one at the end of year 2. Group 1 (n = 35) received a traditional pre-clinical curriculum. Group 2 (n = 47) received a curriculum that included communication skills training integrated into a 'professional development' vertical module. Videoed consultations were rated using the Evans Interview Rating Scale by communication skills tutors. A subset of 27% were double-coded. Inter-rater reliability is reported.Results: Students who had received the professional development teaching achieved higher ratings for use of silence, not interrupting the patient, and keeping the discussion relevant compared to students receiving the traditional curriculum. Patient-centred attitudes were not related to observed communication. Students who were less nervous and felt they knew how to listen were rated as better communicators. Students receiving the traditional curriculum and who had been rated as better communicators when they entered medical school performed less well in the final year clinical examination.Conclusions: Students receiving the professional development training showed significant improvements in certain communication skills, but students in both cohorts improved over time. The lack of a relationship between observed communication skills and patient-centred attitudes may be a reflection of students' inexperience in working with patients, resulting in 'patient-centredness' being an abstract concept. Students in the early years of their medical course may benefit from further opportunities to practise basic communication skills on a one-to-one basis with patients.

Type:Article
Title:Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills?
Open access status:An open access publication. A version is also available from UCL Discovery.
DOI:10.1186/1472-6920-11-41
Publisher version:http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6920-11-41
Language:English
Additional information: © 2011 Joekes et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords:communication skills, patient-centredness, medical student, curriculum change, video observation, PATIENT COMMUNICATION, RELIABILITY, COMPETENCE, CURRICULUM, PHYSICIANS, ACQUIRE
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > UCL Medical School
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME

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