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Adverse endothelial function and the insulin resistance syndrome

Tooke, JE; Hannemann, MM; (2000) Adverse endothelial function and the insulin resistance syndrome. J INTERN MED , 247 (4) 425 - 431.

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Abstract

Type 2 diabetes is characterized by impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation which may contribute to the high prevalence of vascular disease in such patients. Although hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and hypertension can all independently cause a similar defect, recent data suggest that endothelial dysfunction may be intrinsic to the insulin resistance syndrome that commonly precedes type 2 diabetes. Such abnormalities in endothelial function could represent the impact of subclinical disturbance of metabolism or alternatively the presence of a common cellular defect that influences both nitric oxide bioavailability and insulin mediated glucose disposal. Resolution of this puzzle is likely to lead to important advances in our knowledge and ultimately treatment of vascular disease.

Type:Article
Title:Adverse endothelial function and the insulin resistance syndrome
Keywords:insulin resistance syndrome, endothelial function, foetal programming, foetal insulin hypothesis, CORONARY VASOMOTOR TONE, ESSENTIAL-HYPERTENSION, VASCULAR-DISEASE, DEPENDENT VASODILATATION, GLUCOCORTICOID EXPOSURE, ADULT HYPERTENSION, PRENATAL EXPOSURE, GLUCOSE-TOLERANCE, CELL DYSFUNCTION, ADIPOSE-TISSUE
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences

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