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The Novus Codex and the Codex Repetitae Praelectionis: Justinian and his codes

Corcoran, S; (2011) The Novus Codex and the Codex Repetitae Praelectionis: Justinian and his codes. In: Benoist, S and Daguet-Gagey, A and Hoët-van Cauwenberghe, C, (eds.) Figures d’empire, fragments de mémoire: pouvoirs et identités dans le monde romain impérial (IIe s. av. n. è.–VIe s. ap. n. è.). (425 - 444). Presses Universitaires du Septentrion: Villeneuve d'Ascq.

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Abstract

The First Edition of Justinian’s Code appeared in 529, modelled on the Theodosian Code (438) and two earlier codes, the Gregorianus and Hermogenianus (290s). These two latter do not survive, but as compilations of imperial constitutions collected into the then new-style codex, ordered by book, thematic title and then chronological order, they set the pattern for the later imperial codes, even though bearing the names of their authors, who were the heirs of the classical jurists. Justinian’s Code built on these foundations, but also both subsumed and superseded the existing codes. However, major legal changes after 529 meant that a Second Edition, the one which survives today, had to be produced in 534. Although some differences between the two codes can be deduced from the later one alone, only P. Oxy. 1814, a papyrus index for part of Book I of the First Edition, enables explicit comparison. This reveals important details about the processes of addition, deletion, substitution and relocation of constitutions. Although Justinian continued to legislate after 534, he never again attempted to integrate the new into the old, as he had done so ambitiously in the early years of his reign.

Type:Book chapter
Title:The Novus Codex and the Codex Repetitae Praelectionis: Justinian and his codes
ISBN:2757403338
ISBN-13:9782757403334
Publisher version:http://www.septentrion.com/fr/livre/?GCOI=27574100307480
Language:English
Additional information:This volume represents papers delivered at a series of interconnected colloquia held in Lille between October and December 2008.
UCL classification:UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences > History

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