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Rumination, experiential avoidance, and dysfunctional thinking in eating disorders

Rawal, A; Park, RJ; Williams, JMG; (2010) Rumination, experiential avoidance, and dysfunctional thinking in eating disorders. BEHAV RES THER , 48 (9) 851 - 859. 10.1016/j.brat.2010.05.009. Gold open access

Abstract

The majority of research in eating disorders (ED) has investigated the content of disorder-specific thoughts, while few studies have addressed underlying cognitive-affective processes. A better understanding of processes underpinning ED may have important implications for treatment development. Two studies were conducted that investigated levels of rumination, beliefs about rumination, experiential avoidance, and aspects of schematic thinking in individuals with eating pathology. The latter was assessed with a newly designed ED-Sentence Completion Task (ED-SCT). Study 1 (N = 177) examined relations between ED psychopathology and these variables in a student population. Extending this, Study 2 (N = 26) assessed differences between patients with anorexia nervosa and healthy control participants. The results showed that ED psychopathology was related to disorder-specific cognitions, experiential avoidance as well as ruminative brooding but not reflection. A follow-up of anorexia nervosa patients indicated that changes in ED psychopathology were associated with changes in dysfunctional attitudes and maladaptive cognitive-affective processes. These findings highlight cognitive processes that may play an important role in the maintenance of eating pathology. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Rumination, experiential avoidance, and dysfunctional thinking in eating disorders
Open access status: An open access publication
DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2010.05.009
Keywords: Rumination, Avoidance, Thought processes, Eating disorders, Dysfunctional attitudes, Self-focus, SCHEMATIC MENTAL MODELS, POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER, COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR THERAPY, SELF-REPORT QUESTIONNAIRE, ANOREXIA-NERVOSA, DEPRESSIVE THINKING, BULIMIA-NERVOSA, CORE BELIEFS, UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS, REPETITIVE THOUGHT
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/130247
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