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Oxidation-Specific Biomarkers, Lipoprotein(a), and Risk of Fatal and Nonfatal Coronary Events

Tsimikas, S; Mallat, Z; Talmud, PJ; Kastelein, JJP; Wareham, NJ; Sandhu, MS; ... Boekholdt, SM; + view all (2010) Oxidation-Specific Biomarkers, Lipoprotein(a), and Risk of Fatal and Nonfatal Coronary Events. J AM COLL CARDIOL , 56 (12) 946 - 955. 10.1016/j.jacc.2010.04.048.

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Abstract

Objectives This study sought to assess whether oxidation-specific biomarkers are associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) events.Background The relationship of a panel of oxidative biomarkers and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] to CAD risk is not fully determined. Methods A prospective case-control study nested in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation of Cancer)-Norfolk cohort of 45- to 79-year-old apparently healthy men and women followed for similar to 6 years was designed. Cases consisted of participants in whom fatal or nonfatal CAD developed, matched by sex, age, and enrollment time with controls without CAD. Baseline levels of oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-100 particles and Lp(a) were measured in 763 cases and 1,397 controls. Their relationship to secretory phospholipase A(2) type IIA mass and activity, myeloperoxidase mass, and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) activity and association with CAD events were determined.Results After adjusting for age, smoking, diabetes, low-and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure, the highest tertiles of oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-100 particles and Lp(a) were associated with a significantly higher risk of CAD events (odds ratios: 1.67 and 1.64, respectively; p < 0.001) compared with the lowest tertiles. The odds ratio of CAD events associated with the highest tertiles of oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-100 particles or Lp(a) was significantly potentiated (approximately doubled) by the highest tertiles of secretory phospholipase A(2) activity and mass but less so for myeloperoxidase and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) activity. The odds ratios for fatal CAD were higher than for the combined end point. After taking into account the Framingham Risk Score, c-index values progressively increased when oxidative biomarkers were added to the model.Conclusions This EPIC-Norfolk study links pathophysiologically related oxidation-specific biomarkers and Lp(a) with CAD events. Oxidation-specific biomarkers provide cumulative predictive value when added to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2010; 56: 946-55) (C) 2010 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation

Type:Article
Title:Oxidation-Specific Biomarkers, Lipoprotein(a), and Risk of Fatal and Nonfatal Coronary Events
DOI:10.1016/j.jacc.2010.04.048
Keywords:atherosclerosis, biomarkers, myocardial infarction, oxidation, LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN, SECRETORY PHOSPHOLIPASE-A2 ACTIVITY, APOLIPOPROTEIN B-100 PARTICLES, APPARENTLY HEALTHY-MEN, OXIDIZED PHOSPHOLIPIDS, ARTERY-DISEASE, EPIC-NORFOLK, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, PLASMA-LEVELS, SERUM-LEVELS
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science

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